Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Risk Factors among Students of Atse Fasil General Elementary School Azezo, Northwest Ethiopia

Authors

  • Mengistu Endris UoG
  • Getasew Walle UoG
  • Belaynew Wassie UoG
  • Mulugeta Aemiro UoG
  • Ligabaw Worku UoG
  • Simon G/tsadik UoG
  • Takele Teklu UoG
  • Wubet Birhan UoG
  • Jemal Ali UoG
  • Bemnet Amare UoG
  • Martha Alemayehu UoG
  • Belay Anagaw UoG
  • Aschalew Gelaw UoG
  • Beyene Moges UoG
  • Yeshambel Belyhun UoG
  • Wossenseged Lemma UoG
  • Meseret Delelegn UoG

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20372/ejhbs.v3iI.175

Keywords:

Intestinal parasites, Schistosoma mansoni, school children

Abstract

Background: In Ethiopia, intestinal parasitoses are among the ten top causes of morbidity, particularly in children. Different studies in the country reported a high prevalence rate of intestinal parasite in school children, but the epidemiological information in Azezo area is not yet available. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, intensity and associated risk factors of intestinal parasites among school children of Azezo.
Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 10 to June 30, 2008, on 354 students selected from Atse Fasil General Elementary School in Azezo-Gondar town, northwest Ethiopia using stratified proportionate random sampling method.
A stool sample was collected from each student for intestinal parasite examination using direct saline preparation, formol-ether concentration, and Kato-thick smear techniques. Data regarding socio-demographic, environmental and behavioral factors were collected using a pre-tested structured questionnaire; they were cleaned before they were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 soft ware.
Results: Out of the 354 students examined, 258 (72.9%) were positive for one or more species of parasites. The prevalence rate was 78.9% for males and 68.6% for females. The most common parasites recovered were Schistosoma mansoni 154 (43.5%) followed by Ascaris lumbricoides 102(28.8%) and Trichuris trichiura 64(18.1%). Eleven students (3.1%) showed heavy parasitic infection. Sex, poor personal hygiene, lack of protective shoe, and frequent swimming habits showed statistically significant association with high rates of parasitic infections (P<0.05).
Conclusion and recommendation: The high prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among school children in the study area indicates the need for therapeutic intervention and health education.

Author Biographies

Mengistu Endris, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Belaynew Wassie, UoG

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics

Mulugeta Aemiro, UoG

Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Computational Sciences

Ligabaw Worku, UoG

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences

Simon G/tsadik, UoG

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences

Takele Teklu, UoG

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences

Wubet Birhan, UoG

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of
Medicine and Health Sciences

Jemal Ali, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Bemnet Amare, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Martha Alemayehu, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Belay Anagaw, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Aschalew Gelaw, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Beyene Moges, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Yeshambel Belyhun, UoG

Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

Wossenseged Lemma, UoG

Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences

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Published

2021-06-17

How to Cite

1.
Endris M, Walle G, Wassie B, Aemiro M, Worku L, G/tsadik S, Teklu T, Birhan W, Ali J, Amare B, Alemayehu M, Anagaw B, Gelaw A, Moges B, Belyhun Y, Lemma W, Delelegn M. Prevalence of Intestinal Parasites and Associated Risk Factors among Students of Atse Fasil General Elementary School Azezo, Northwest Ethiopia. Ethiop J Health Biomed Sci [Internet]. 2021 Jun. 17 [cited 2024 May 29];3(I):25-33. Available from: https://journal.uog.edu.et/index.php/EJHBS/article/view/175

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