Transfersomes: Pivotal Role in Drug Delivery

Authors

  • Kamal Dua
  • Kavita Pabreja
  • V.K.Sharma
  • U.V.Singh Sara
  • D.K.Agrawal

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20372/ejhbs.v2i1.35

Keywords:

Transdermal, Vesicular, Transfersomes

Abstract

Background and Purposes:There has been keen interest in the development of a novel drug delivery system. Novel drug delivery system aims to deliver the drug at a rate directed by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and channel the active entity to the site of action. At present, no available drug delivery system behaves ideally achieving all the lofty goals, but sincere attempts have been made to achieve them through novel approaches in drug delivery. A number of novel drug delivery systems have emerged encompassing various routes of administration to achieve controlled and targeted drug delivery. Encapsulation of the drug in vesicular structures is one such system which can be predicted to prolong the existence of the drug in systemic circulation and reduce the toxicity, if selective uptake can be achieved. Advances have since been made in the area of vesicular drug delivery leading to the development of systems that allow drug targeting and the sustained or controlled release of conventional medicines. The focus of this review is to bring out the application, advantages, and drawbacks of vesicular systems. One of such vesicular system includes Transfersomes.

Conclusion:Transfersomes are complex most often vesicular aggregates optimized to attain extremely flexible and selfregulating membranes which make the vesicles very deformable. These systems can be successfully used in animals and humans for the transcutaneous and protein delivery.

Downloads

Published

2020-11-24

How to Cite

1.
Kamal Dua, Kavita Pabreja, V.K.Sharma, U.V.Singh Sara, D.K.Agrawal. Transfersomes: Pivotal Role in Drug Delivery. Ethiop J Health Biomed Sci [Internet]. 2020 Nov. 24 [cited 2024 Jul. 20];2(1):6. Available from: https://journal.uog.edu.et/index.php/EJHBS/article/view/35

Issue

Section

Brief Communication