Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Association with Cutaneous Fungal Infection and Nutritional Status among Tseda School Children, Northwest Ethiopia

Authors

  • Feleke Moges UoG
  • Moges Tiruneh UoG
  • Feleke Moges UoG
  • Yeshambel Belyhun UoG
  • Yenew Kebede UoG
  • Andargachew Mulu UoG
  • Afework Kassu UoG

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20372/ejhbs.v3iI.174

Keywords:

Intestinal parasitoses, nutritional status, cutaneous fungal infections, school children

Abstract

Background: Intestinal parasitic infections are the major cause and contributory factors for malnutrition. In Ethiopia, there is
no report on the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in association with cutaneous fungal infections and nutritional
status among school children.
Objective: To assess the magnitude and association of intestinal parasitic infections with cutaneous fungal infections and nutritional status among school children. 
Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on the school children of Tseda town, northwest Ethiopia. A total of 870 eligible students enrolled and their sociodemographic and anthropometric variables were collected using a structured questionnaire. Clinical investigation was done for fungal infections. Stool specimen was collected and examined microscopically, following formol-ether concentration technique. Three anthropometric indices height for age, weight for age, and weight for height were expressed as differences from the mean in standard deviation units or Z-scores.
Result: Out of 870 students, 43.0% were male and 57% female. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitoses was 72.8%.
Single and multiple infections were seen in 35.1% and 37.7% children, respectively. The most common parasites identified were
Ascaris lumbricoides (49.9%), Schistosomia mansoni (29.5%), and Hookworm (15.3%). Cutaneous fungal infection was observed in 12.1% of the children. Tinea capitis was the predominate fungus (6.2%). Children who had cutaneous fungal infections were more likely to have one or more intestinal parasites than those who did not (P<0.01). The proportion of children
with underweight, stunting and wasting was 11.4%, 10.9%, and 2.9%, respectively.
Conclusion: The results of this study showed that intestinal parasitoses and cutaneous fungal infections were high among school children in the area. It also appeared that intestinal parasitic infections were associated with cutaneous fungal infections. Moderate and childhood malnutrition was also common. Our result called for appropriate intervention measures to reduce childhood morbidity from parasitic and fungal infections, and malnutrition.

Author Biographies

Feleke Moges, UoG

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Moges Tiruneh, UoG

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Feleke Moges, UoG

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Yeshambel Belyhun, UoG

1Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Yenew Kebede, UoG

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Andargachew Mulu, UoG

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Afework Kassu, UoG

Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, the University of Gondar. P.O. Box 196, Gondar, Ethiopia

Downloads

Published

2021-06-17

How to Cite

1.
Moges F, Tiruneh M, Moges F, Belyhun Y, Kebede Y, Mulu A, Kassu A. Intestinal Parasitic Infections in Association with Cutaneous Fungal Infection and Nutritional Status among Tseda School Children, Northwest Ethiopia. Ethiop J Health Biomed Sci [Internet]. 2021 Jun. 17 [cited 2024 Feb. 26];3(I):35-44. Available from: https://journal.uog.edu.et/index.php/EJHBS/article/view/174

Issue

Section

Orginal Articles

Most read articles by the same author(s)